Today, my colleague Brittany Rye and I announced Brush of Seattle, a map-driven guide to Seattle’s permanent public street art, its COVID-19 storefront murals and its plentiful Little Free Libraries.

Brush of Seattle allows Seattle residents and people from anywhere in the world the opportunity to browse street art over the Internet. The site contains 555 murals, 2,106 photos and 381 additional Little Free Libraries.

Beautiful COVID-19 storefront mural on plywood of medical care provider in scrubs

Brush is a follow on to my 2018 PortlandWild.com website. Instead of including unique trees this time, the site offers both permanent murals and storefront murals on plywood, boarded up due to Washington State’s COVID19 shutdown.

The array of COVID19 art is exceptional. Seattle’s artists really came out with their best work. You can browse COVID19 art on its own via this link. Or, you can toggle the COVID19 virus icon in the lower left of the screen.

Seahorses with healthy Lungs, COVID19 Public Art by Burgundy Viscosi

Brittany and I hope that Brush of Seattle provides an additional explorative and playful option for kids, parents and residents stuck at home more often than not and that it also provides a fun option for outdoor adventures.

We do want to gather more murals from around the region which we have not yet fully reached. We welcome submissions. Brush of Seattle will continue as a living project.

We greatly appreciate 4Culture for generously allowing us to integrate and share the SODO Track murals along the southern light rail route. Learn more at the SODOTRACK website.

We are also actively working on adding more artist information to the murals.

Be sure to check out Brush of Seattle’s popular permanent murals and its popular COVID19 murals pages.

If you login to the site you can favorite murals and add murals you’ve visited to your passport!

We hope you enjoy the site!

Posted by Jeff Reifman

Jeff is a technology consultant based in the Pacific Northwest. Check out Portland Wild, a visual map-driven guide to Portland's public art, its Heritage Trees and its Little Free Libraries.

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *