assistive technology tim clemans

Tim Clemans, New York Times

This year I’ve been building a friendship with Tim Clemans, an inspired technologist who has struggled with emotional outbursts. You may have heard of Tim’s focus on radical transparency especially related to 911 records and police body cams. In fact, the New York Times Magazine published a cover story, Should We See Everything a Cop Sees? about him and he’s been covered across Seattle media as well.

If you’ve hung out with me recently, you know that homelessness in Seattle is at epic levels and Amazon’s anti-tax anti-government stance has hampered local efforts to address it. Tim is one of my friends is who is currently homeless. And Seattle has a long waiting list for safe housing. Trump has not made America great again.

I’d like to ask you to join me and others supporting Tim’s fundraising for a relatively inexpensive camper van to give him a safe shelter until he can progress to something more permanent. It’s at GoFundMe.

Please watch this video of Tim talking about his history, his passion and his focus on a field known as Psychiatric Assistive Technology. I’ve witnessed first hand Tim’s personal growth from use of the bluetooth button he talks about in the video and his rapid rate of successful self-management episodes from combining this technology with an automated connection to the crisis text line.

As Tim courageously shares, he suffers from a few emotional disorders, one known awkwardly as Intermittent Explosive Disorder. I’ve been with Tim both in person and on the phone during a couple of his “eruptions” and I’ve watched him blend inspiration, intense commitment and technology to soothe himself in the moment and increasingly grow command of himself and his emotions.

Tim’s a visionary in this field. He is intensely creative and I look forward to seeing what he can accomplish. Help me help him get safe livable shelter and let’s watch what he can do.

 

Posted by Jeff Reifman

Jeff is a technology consultant based in the Pacific Northwest. Check out Portland Wild, a visual map-driven guide to Portland's public art, its Heritage Trees and its Little Free Libraries.